(Source: chicparadise2)

Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky,
Seven for the Dwarf-lords in halls of stone,
Nine for Mortal Men, doomed to die,
One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.
One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them.
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.”

J.R.R. Tolkien died in 1973!! 

mexq:

from The Burmese Harp / ビルマの竪琴 Biruma no tategoto (Kon Ichikawa, 1956)

viα boromihrOne Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them. In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.

Andreas Schimanski

Andreas Schimanski

For all those people who died but weren’t famous. For those who committed suicide and for those who were murdered. For people who fought cancer (or any other disease) but were unable to defeat it. For those people who lost someone. For the lost souls out there.

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A cemetery is a spatially defined area where the remains of dead people are buried or otherwise interred. The word cemetery (from Greek κοιμητήριον, “sleeping place”) implies that the land is specifically designated as a burial ground. The intact or cremated remains of people may be interred in a grave, commonly referred to as burial, or in a tomb, an “above-ground grave” (resembling a sarcophagus), a mausoleum, columbarium, or other edifice. In Western cultures, funeral ceremonies are often observed in cemeteries. These ceremonies or rites of passage differ according to cultural practices and religious beliefs. Modern cemeteries often include crematoria, and some grounds previously used for both, continue as crematoria as a principal use long after the interment areas have been filled. | source | edit | 

A cemetery is a spatially defined area where the remains of dead people are buried or otherwise interred. The word cemetery (from Greek κοιμητήριον, “sleeping place”) implies that the land is specifically designated as a burial ground. The intact or cremated remains of people may be interred in a grave, commonly referred to as burial, or in a tomb, an “above-ground grave” (resembling a sarcophagus), a mausoleum, columbarium, or other edifice. In Western cultures, funeral ceremonies are often observed in cemeteries. These ceremonies or rites of passage differ according to cultural practices and religious beliefs. Modern cemeteries often include crematoria, and some grounds previously used for both, continue as crematoria as a principal use long after the interment areas have been filled. | source | edit | 

rurik-dmitrienko:

Hussards

By Rurik Dmitrienko

zondvloed:

This is a photography depicting three austrian woman moments after their suicides in 1945, in fear of the ever-approaching Red Army from the northeast. They had been told through word-of-mouth and possibly also by the authorities that the Soviet Forces were worse than beasts, and raped, pillaged and murdered with contemptuous disrespect anything that got in their way. Cases of mass suicides could be observed through-out german-speaking Europe as the war took its last breaths. 

zondvloed:

This is a photography depicting three austrian woman moments after their suicides in 1945, in fear of the ever-approaching Red Army from the northeast. They had been told through word-of-mouth and possibly also by the authorities that the Soviet Forces were worse than beasts, and raped, pillaged and murdered with contemptuous disrespect anything that got in their way. Cases of mass suicides could be observed through-out german-speaking Europe as the war took its last breaths. 

nerdalois:

"i want ciel phantomhive’s wardrobe"

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(Source: baptiser)

― Jim Henson | Transparent 

Jim Henson | Transparent 

Steeple and stained glass, Sacred Heart Church at Maryknoll School, Makiki, Honolulu, May 2008. source | edit

Steeple and stained glass, Sacred Heart Church at Maryknoll School, Makiki, Honolulu, May 2008. source | edit

Longinus (2004)

Longinus (2004)

Trojan Horse

The Trojan Horse is a tale from the Trojan War about the subterfuge that the Greeks used to enter the city of Troy and win the conflict. In the canonical version, after a fruitless 10-year siege, the Greeks constructed a huge wooden horse, and hid a select force of men inside. The Greeks pretended to sail away, and the Trojans pulled the horse into their city as a victory trophy. That night the Greek force crept out of the horse and opened the gates for the rest of the Greek army, which had sailed back under cover of night. The Greeks entered and destroyed the city of Troy, decisively ending the war. The main ancient source for the story is the Aeneid of Virgil, a Latin epic poem from the time of Augustus. The event is referred to in Homer’s Odyssey. In the Greek tradition, the horse is called the "Wooden Horse" (Δούρειος Ἵππος, Doúreios Híppos, in the Homeric Ionic dialect). Metaphorically a “Trojan Horse” has come to mean any trick or stratagem that causes a target to allow a foe into a securely protected bastion or space. Malicious computer programs which trick users into running them as routine, useful, or interesting are called Trojan horses.

(Source: mortisia)

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