Glasgow Necropolis || Personal photography © 2014

The Glasgow Necropolis is a Victorian cemetery in Glasgow, Scotland.

(Source: mortisia)

― Sorin Cerin, Wisdom Collection The Book of Wisdom

Sorin Cerin, Wisdom Collection The Book of Wisdom

The Cathedral of St. John the Divine, officially the Cathedral Church of Saint John: The Great Divine in the City and Diocese of New York, is the cathedral of the Episcopal Diocese of New York. It is located in New York City on Amsterdam Avenue between West 110th Street and 113th Street in Manhattan’s Morningside Heights neighborhood. The cathedral vies with Liverpool Cathedral for the title of the largest Anglican cathedral and church. It is also the fourth largest Christian church in the world. The interior covers 121,000 sq ft (11,200 m2), spanning a length of 601 ft (183.2 meters) and height 232 ft (70.7 meters). The interior height of the nave is 124 feet (37.8 meters).

The cathedral, designed in 1888 and begun in 1892, has undergone radical stylistic changes and the interruption of the two World Wars. Originally designed in the Byzantine Revival-Romanesque Revival styles, the plan was changed after 1909 to a Gothic Revival design. After a large fire on December 18, 2001, it was closed for repairs and reopened in November 2008. It remains unfinished, with construction and restoration a continuing process. As a result, it is often nicknamed St. John the Unfinished. Read More | Edit

Greyfriars Kirkyard, Edinburgh, Scotland.Personal photography © 2014

Greyfriars Kirkyard, Edinburgh, Scotland.
Personal photography © 2014

Howard Carter (9 May 1874 – 2 March 1939) was an English archaeologist and Egyptologist who became world famous after discovering the intact tomb of 14th-century BC pharaoh Tutankhamun (colloquially known as “King Tut” and “the boy king”) in November 1922. Read More

(Source: mortisia)

Séance

A séance /ˈseɪ.ɑːns/ or seance is an attempt to communicate with spirits. The word “séance” comes from the French word for “seat,” “session” or “sitting,” from the Old French “seoir,” “to sit.” In French, the word’s meaning is quite general: one may, for example, speak of “une séance de cinéma” (“a movie session”). In English, however, the word came to be used specifically for a meeting of people who are gathered to receive messages from spirits or to listen to a spirit medium discourse with or relay messages from spirits; many people, including skeptics and non-believers, treat it as a form of entertainment. In modern English usage, participants need not be seated while engaged in a séance. One of the earliest books on the subject of communication amongst deceased persons was Communitation With the Other Side by George, First Baron Lyttelton, published in England in 1760. Among the notable spirits quoted in this volume are Peter the Great, Pericles, a “North-American Savage,” William Penn, and Christina, Queen of Sweden. The popularity of séances grew dramatically with the founding of the religion of Spiritualism in the mid-nineteenth century. Perhaps the best-known series of séances conducted at that time were those of Mary Todd Lincoln who, grieving the loss of her son, organized Spiritualist séances in the White House, which were attended by her husband, President Abraham Lincoln, and other prominent members of society. The 1887 Seybert Commission report marred the credibility of Spiritualism at the height of its popularity by publishing exposures of fraud and showmanship among secular séance leaders. Modern séances continue to be a part of the religious services of Spiritualist, Spiritist, and Espiritismo churches today, where a greater emphasis is placed on spiritual values versus showmanship. x

(Source: mortisia)

Jorōgumo (Japanese Kanji: 絡新婦, Hiragana: じょろうぐも) is a type of Yōkai, a creature, ghost or goblin of Japanese folklore. According to some stories, a Jorōgumo is a spider that can change its appearance into that of a seductive woman. In Japanese Kanji, Jorōgumo is written as “絡新婦” (literally meaning "binding bride") or “女郎蜘蛛” (literally meaning “whore spider”). Jorōgumo can also refer to some species of spiders, but in casual use it can refer to the Nephila and Argiope spiders. Japanese-speaking entomologists use the katakana form of Jorōgumo (ジョロウグモ) to refer, exclusively, to the spider species Nephila clavata. x || Awesome right? ♡♡

(Source: mortisia)

Speos Artemidos
The Speos Artemidos (Grotto of Artemis) is an archaeological site in Egypt. It is located about 2 km south of the Middle Kingdom tombs at Beni Hasan, and about 28 km south of Al Minya. Today, the site is a small village known as Istabl Antar. There are two temples here, both of which are dedicated to Pakhet. They are cut out of the rock into the cliffs on the eastern side of the Nile. One of the temples, built by Queen Hatshepsut, has an architrave bearing a long dedicatory text with her famous denunciation of the Hyksos. ( The Hyksos or Hycsos (/ˈhɪksɒs/ or /ˈhɪksoʊz/;[3] Egyptian heqa khaseshet, “ruler(s) of the foreign countries”; Greek Ὑκσώς, Ὑξώς) were an Asiatic people from West Asia who took over the eastern Nile Delta, ending the Thirteenth dynasty of Egypt and initiating the Second Intermediate Period.)
An earlier temple was probably located here, but no traces older than that of Hatshepsut have been found. The decorations inside have been usurped by Seti I in places, his name replacing that of Hatshepsut. Cut from the living rock, the temple is composed of two chambers connected by a short passageway. The outer portico is rectangular and originally had eight stone columns arranged in two rows Unfortunately, only three of the four columns forming the facade are still relatively intact and none of the internal pillars remain. The rock face above the external pillars of the portico is dressed and inscribed with text bearing Hatshesput’s name. It includes the famous text in which she denounces the Hyksos and records her actions in rebuilding the damage they had caused thus legitimising her own reign. Within the portico only the southern wall bears any inscription. The text originally referred to Hatshepsut but was usurped by Seti I who also added further dedications. The smaller inner sanctuary is square with a statue niche at the back. It was not inscribed by Hatshepsut and Brand has suggested that it was in fact Seti who first excavated the passageway and sanctuary. Seti altered the text to replace Hatshepsut’s name with his own and changed representations of the Queen to depictions of himself, but Fairman and Grdseloff argued that there was no clear evidence that Tuthmosis III defaced the chapel when he was expunging her name from other monuments late in his reign despite the existence of his name on some of the pillars of the portico. This conclusion is queried by Brand who suggests that an image of the queen had been vandalised by Tuthmosis and later recarved to depict Seti. Likewise Fairman and Grdseloff did not find evidence that Akhenaten had defaced the name of Amun but Brand concluded that Seti had repaired this damage and notes at least one instance where an earlier version of one of the arms of Amun was still visible. Brand notes that Seti also replaced an image of a priest was replaced with that of the god Thoth and concludes that this was the result of the increasing influence of this god’s temple in Hermopolis during the reign of Seti. Finally Brand notes that Seti added three scenes to the depictions of the coronation of Hatshepsut but (contrary to Fairman and Grdseloff) found no evidence that he had usurped these scenes from Hatshepsut.

Speos Artemidos

The Speos Artemidos (Grotto of Artemis) is an archaeological site in Egypt. It is located about 2 km south of the Middle Kingdom tombs at Beni Hasan, and about 28 km south of Al Minya. Today, the site is a small village known as Istabl Antar. There are two temples here, both of which are dedicated to Pakhet. They are cut out of the rock into the cliffs on the eastern side of the Nile. One of the temples, built by Queen Hatshepsut, has an architrave bearing a long dedicatory text with her famous denunciation of the Hyksos. ( The Hyksos or Hycsos (/ˈhɪksɒs/ or /ˈhɪksoʊz/;[3] Egyptian heqa khaseshet, “ruler(s) of the foreign countries”; Greek Ὑκσώς, Ὑξώς) were an Asiatic people from West Asia who took over the eastern Nile Delta, ending the Thirteenth dynasty of Egypt and initiating the Second Intermediate Period.)

An earlier temple was probably located here, but no traces older than that of Hatshepsut have been found. The decorations inside have been usurped by Seti I in places, his name replacing that of Hatshepsut. Cut from the living rock, the temple is composed of two chambers connected by a short passageway. The outer portico is rectangular and originally had eight stone columns arranged in two rows Unfortunately, only three of the four columns forming the facade are still relatively intact and none of the internal pillars remain. The rock face above the external pillars of the portico is dressed and inscribed with text bearing Hatshesput’s name. It includes the famous text in which she denounces the Hyksos and records her actions in rebuilding the damage they had caused thus legitimising her own reign. Within the portico only the southern wall bears any inscription. The text originally referred to Hatshepsut but was usurped by Seti I who also added further dedications. The smaller inner sanctuary is square with a statue niche at the back. It was not inscribed by Hatshepsut and Brand has suggested that it was in fact Seti who first excavated the passageway and sanctuary. Seti altered the text to replace Hatshepsut’s name with his own and changed representations of the Queen to depictions of himself, but Fairman and Grdseloff argued that there was no clear evidence that Tuthmosis III defaced the chapel when he was expunging her name from other monuments late in his reign despite the existence of his name on some of the pillars of the portico. This conclusion is queried by Brand who suggests that an image of the queen had been vandalised by Tuthmosis and later recarved to depict Seti. Likewise Fairman and Grdseloff did not find evidence that Akhenaten had defaced the name of Amun but Brand concluded that Seti had repaired this damage and notes at least one instance where an earlier version of one of the arms of Amun was still visible. Brand notes that Seti also replaced an image of a priest was replaced with that of the god Thoth and concludes that this was the result of the increasing influence of this god’s temple in Hermopolis during the reign of Seti. Finally Brand notes that Seti added three scenes to the depictions of the coronation of Hatshepsut but (contrary to Fairman and Grdseloff) found no evidence that he had usurped these scenes from Hatshepsut.

Bibliophilia or bibliophilism is the love of books. From the Greek βιβλίο (book) + φιλία (philia), often translated “brotherly love”, is one of the four ancient Greek words for love. Accordingly a bibliophile is an individual who loves books. A bookworm (sometimes pejorative) is someone who loves books for their content, or who otherwise loves reading. The -ia suffixed form "bibliophilia" is sometimes considered to be an incorrect usage; the older "bibliophilism" is considered more correct. The adjective form of the term is bibliophilic. A bibliophile may be, but is not necessarily, a book collector.

HISTORY OF  B O O K  COLLECTING x 

The true collecting of books can be said to have begun with the collecting of illuminated manuscripts of second-hand and commissioned origin. This practice became common in the 15th century, particularly with the elites of Burgundy and France. With what appears to be the largest collection of his day, Duke Philip the Good of Burgundy accumulated a collection that contained about six hundred volumes. There are two particular events in history that fueled individuals in the early days of book collecting, the invention of movable type in book printing and the Reformation. The invention of movable type made it easier and cheaper to print books, which in turn made it easier for people to get their hands on books. During the Reformation, Henry VIII confiscated the property of monastic institutions throughout England, Wales, and Ireland. The university, college, and monastic libraries of the time were plundered and many of the books either destroyed or sold off. In order to keep the books from being lost or destroyed, many who could began to collect them. Book collecting as a pastime, rather than a necessity, is more of a modern invention. Book collecting essentially began as a way to bring together a collection of books for use and study, rather than as collectibles. Other early collectors were dubbed so, simply because they owned a shelf of volumes stamped with their coat of arms. In China, the history of collecting books began over two millennia ago. In the early Han Dynasty the Chinese government made an effort to collect books as many important books had been burned in the Qin Dynasty. As in Western culture, book collecting became more prevelant and easier when block printing was invented in the early Tang Dynasty.

(Source: mortisia)

Galen

Aelius Galenus or Claudius Galenus (AD 129 – c. 200/c. 216), better known as Galen of Pergamon was a prominent Greek physician, surgeon and philosopher in the Roman empire. Arguably the most accomplished of all medical researchers of antiquity, Galen influenced the development of various scientific disciplines, including anatomy, physiology, pathology, pharmacology, and neurology, as well as philosophy and logic. The son of Aelius Nicon, a wealthy architect with scholarly interests, Galen received a comprehensive education that prepared him for a successful career as a physician and philosopher. He traveled extensively, exposing himself to a wide variety of medical theories and discoveries before settling in Rome, where he served prominent members of Roman society and eventually was given the position of personal physician to several emperors. Galen’s understanding of anatomy and medicine was principally influenced by the then-current theory of humorism, as advanced by ancient Greek physicians such as Hippocrates. His theories dominated and influenced Western medical science for more than 1,300 years. His anatomical reports, based mainly on dissection of monkeys, especially the Barbary Macaque, and pigs, remained uncontested until 1543, when printed descriptions and illustrations of human dissections were published in the seminal work De humani corporis fabrica by Andreas Vesalius where Galen’s physiological theory was accommodated to these new observations. Galen’s theory of the physiology of the circulatory system endured until 1628, when William Harvey published his treatise entitled De motu cordis, in which he established that blood circulates, with the heart acting as a pump. Medical students continued to study Galen’s writings until well into the 19th century. Galen conducted many nerve ligation experiments that supported the theory, which is still accepted today, that the brain controls all the motions of the muscles by means of the cranial and peripheral nervous systems.

Galen saw himself as both a physician and a philosopher, as he wrote in his treatise entitled That the Best Physician is also a Philosopher. Galen was very interested in the debate between the rationalist and empiricist medical sects and his use of direct observation, dissection and vivisection represents a complex middle ground between the extremes of those two viewpoints. Many of his works have been preserved and/or translated from the original Greek, although many were destroyed and some credited to him are believed to be spurious. Although there is some debate over the date of his death, he was no younger than seventy when he died.

(Source: mortisia)

Bram Stoker’s D R A C U L A (1992) 

by Francis Ford Coppola with Gary Oldman, Winona Ryder, Anthony Hopkins, Keanu Reeves.

My edits | Plz be kind and don’t remove the gifs to use them separately. They belong together. Thank you!


My edit [ x ]

My edit [ x ]

Silence Has No Wings (1966)Tobenai chinmoku directed by Kazuo Kuroki || Full Movie

Silence Has No Wings (1966)
Tobenai chinmoku directed by Kazuo Kuroki || Full Movie

Da Vinci’s Demons (2013)

An American historical fantasy drama series that presents a fictional account of Leonardo da Vinci’s early life. My edit || Season 1

(Source: mortisia)

Kuroshitsuji : Book of Circus // Anime opening xx

theme by oohcamila