The Mistletoe Bride (1823)
 A story of a newly married couple married in a large farmhouse where she grew up. After the wedding the guests played a game of hide and seek where the groom was. The bride wanting to win, went into the manor house, ran up to the attic, found an old trunk and hid in it. Nobody could find her including her husband who just figured she grew tired and went to sleep. After everyone went home, he began looking for her but couldn’t find her anywhere. She was never found until a few years later when her mother died. The woman’s father was looking through his wife’s things collecting dust in the attic when he found an old chest. The lid was closed and the old lock was rusted shut. Eventually, he opened the lid and was terrified to see his daughter’s corpse there in the chest. When she hid there, the lid had closed and the rusty parts of the lock had latched together, trapping her inside. She suffocated to death. This story appeared in a poem Ginevra by Samuel Rogers. Then there was a short story Ginevra or The old Oak Chest in 1835. It was also turned into a popular song The Mistletoe Bough around that time. It also inspired Henry James to wrote his story The Romance of Certain Old Clothes.

The Mistletoe Bride (1823)

A story of a newly married couple married in a large farmhouse where she grew up. After the wedding the guests played a game of hide and seek where the groom was. The bride wanting to win, went into the manor house, ran up to the attic, found an old trunk and hid in it. Nobody could find her including her husband who just figured she grew tired and went to sleep. After everyone went home, he began looking for her but couldn’t find her anywhere. She was never found until a few years later when her mother died. The woman’s father was looking through his wife’s things collecting dust in the attic when he found an old chest. The lid was closed and the old lock was rusted shut. Eventually, he opened the lid and was terrified to see his daughter’s corpse there in the chest. When she hid there, the lid had closed and the rusty parts of the lock had latched together, trapping her inside. She suffocated to death. This story appeared in a poem Ginevra by Samuel Rogers. Then there was a short story Ginevra or The old Oak Chest in 1835. It was also turned into a popular song The Mistletoe Bough around that time. It also inspired Henry James to wrote his story The Romance of Certain Old Clothes.

Tyrannosaurus (means “tyrant lizard,” from Ancient Greek tyrannos (τύραννος) which means “tyrant,” and sauros (σαῦρος) which means “lizard”) is a genus of coelurosaurian theropod dinosaur. The species Tyrannosaurus rex (rex meaning “king” in Latin), commonly abbreviated to T. rex, is a fixture in popular culture. The T. rex lived throughout what is now western North America, which then was an island continent named Laramidia. Tyrannosaurus had a much wider range than other tyrannosaurids. Fossils are found in a variety of rock formations dating to the Maastrichtian age of the upper Cretaceous Period, 67 to 66 million years ago. It was among the last non-avian dinosaurs to exist before the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event.

Like other tyrannosaurids, Tyrannosaurus was a bipedal carnivore with a massive skull balanced by a long, heavy tail. Relative to its large and powerful hind limbs, Tyrannosaurus fore limbs were short but unusually powerful for their size and had two clawed digits. Although other theropods rivaled or exceeded Tyrannosaurus rex in size, it was the largest known tyrannosaurid and one of the largest known land predators. More than 50 specimens of Tyrannosaurus rex have been identified, some of which are nearly complete skeletons. Soft tissue and proteins have been reported in at least one of these specimens. The abundance of fossil material has allowed significant research into many aspects of its biology, including its life history and biomechanics. Read More | Edit

― Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

— David Foster Wallace

David Foster Wallace

"It is forbidden to kill; therefore all murderers are punished unless they kill in large numbers and to the sound of trumpets."  Voltaire || New blogspot entry.

John Foster Fraser (1860-1936) Round the World on a Wheel
Greek ladies rehearse shoes in Thessaloniki (Θεσσαλονίκη) 1903 - Greece.

John Foster Fraser (1860-1936) Round the World on a Wheel

Greek ladies rehearse shoes in Thessaloniki (Θεσσαλονίκη) 1903 - Greece.

― Natsuki Takaya (高屋 奈月)

Natsuki Takaya (高屋 奈月)

Franz Xaver Winterhalter (20 April 1805 – 8 July 1873) was a German painter and lithographer, known for his portraits of royalty in the mid-nineteenth century. His name has become associated with fashionable court portraiture. Among his best known works are Empress Eugénie Surrounded by her Ladies in Waiting (1855 - original) and the portraits he made of Empress Elisabeth of Austria (1865). Winterhalter came into his own as a portrait painter during the second Empire and he painted his best work during the last two decades of his life. He matched his style to the luxury and relaxed atmosphere of the age, its hedonism and gaiety. His female sitters of the 1850s and 1860s inhabit a different physiological climate from those he painted earlier; they are not reticent and reserved. His male sitters inspired few original or memorable compositions. Read More

(Source: mortisia)

— St. Ambrose

— St. Ambrose

The Pergamon Altar is a monumental construction built during the reign of King Eumenes II in the first half of the 2nd century BC on one of the terraces of the acropolis of the ancient city of Pergamon in Asia Minor [ Pergamon or Pergamum (Ancient Greek: τὸ Πέργαμον, to Pergamon, or ἡ Πέργαμος) was an ancient Greek city in Aeolis, currently located 26 kilometres (16 mi) from the Aegean Sea. ] The structure is 35.64 metres wide and 33.4 metres deep; the front stairway alone is almost 20 metres wide. The base is decorated with a frieze in high relief showing the battle between the Giants and the Olympian gods known as the Gigantomachy. There is a second, smaller and less well-preserved high relief frieze on the inner court walls which surround the actual fire altar on the upper level of the structure at the top of the stairs. In a set of consecutive scenes, it depicts events from the life of Telephus, legendary founder of the city of Pergamon and son of the hero Heracles and Auge, one of Tegean king Aleus’s daughters. In 1878, the German engineer Carl Humann began official excavations on the acropolis of Pergamon, an effort that lasted until 1886. The excavation was undertaken in order to rescue the altar friezes and expose the foundation of the edifice. Later, other ancient structures on the acropolis were brought to light. Upon negotiating with the Turkish government (a participant in the excavation), it was agreed that all frieze fragments found at the time would become the property of the Berlin museums. Read More || Click pictures for more info

(Source: mortisia)

Fallen Warrior from Temple of Aphaia (c 480-470BC)
There is a tragic pathos to this mighty sculpture of a dying hero from a temple on the Greek island of Aegina. Tragedy is a Greek concept. The tragedies of Sophocles, Euripides and Aeschylus are still performed. This statue shows a strong man fallen, heroic to his last breath.

Fallen Warrior from Temple of Aphaia (c 480-470BC)

There is a tragic pathos to this mighty sculpture of a dying hero from a temple on the Greek island of Aegina. Tragedy is a Greek concept. The tragedies of Sophocles, Euripides and Aeschylus are still performed. This statue shows a strong man fallen, heroic to his last breath.

The new Acropolis Museum 
published in: Architecture By Guest, 30 June 2009

Located only 300 meters (980 feet) SouthEast of the Parthenon, with an exhibition space of 14,000 square meters and a cost of €130 million, the New Acropolis Museum houses some of the most famous works of classical antiquity. It aims at providing the visitors with a comprehensive picture of the human presence on the Acropolis, from the pre-historic times through late Antiquity, with the advantage of being built on the slope of the Acropolis itself. The three major materials used for its construction are glass for the facades and some of the floors, concrete for the core and the columns, as well as marble for the galleries… Read More || Video (Opening Ceremony) || Click pictures for more info.

(Source: mortisia)

The Parthenon marbles are the world’s most beautiful art – and that’s why we should give them back.

These consummately beautiful sculptures demand a proper setting – and a trip to Athens has convinced me the Acropolis Museum is that place. What can you do with the world’s most beautiful art? Where does it belong? How should it be cared for and displayed? The art in question is the array of sculpture created in Athens in the 5th century BC to decorate the Parthenon, the temple to Athena that still, today, dominates the skyline of the Greek capital. Notoriously, the best-preserved stone carvings that survived on the temple in the early 19th century were removed by Lord Elgin and brought to London, where they have been a fixture of the British Museum ever since. Equally notoriously, Greece wants the Parthenon marbles (aka the Elgin marbles) back – and in 2009 opened a state-of-the-art museum beneath the Acropolis hill on which the Parthenon stands, to house them.. Read More

(Source: mortisia)

“You can never get a cup of tea large enough or a book long enough to suit me.” ― C.S. Lewis

(Source: mortisia)

Peter Duggan’s Artoon: how not to walk like an Egyptian | Enlarged

Peter Duggan’s Artoon: how not to walk like an Egyptian | Enlarged

theme by oohcamila